Class Descriptions

Clear Float

This pane clears float!

  • ENERGY 2130
    • 3 credits
    • Energy, Environment, and Society
      • The course will provide the student with an overview of issues related to energy and renewable energy, including usage trends, historical patterns, social responses to energy changes, economic factors, market forces, geographical concerns, the various forms and sources of energy including renewable energy and bio-energy, how these sources may affect the environment, and recent developments in energy policies in the U.S. and the world. Energy, power, energy sources, as well as usage patterns by societies over history will be presented. Prerequisite: ENGL1230, Components: Lecture, GE: Social Science
         
  • ENERGY 2340
    • 4 credits
    • Fundamentals of Energy Sources
      • Traditional, renewable, and bio-energy sources and their characteristics. Advantages and disadvantages of existing and future sources of energy and bio-products. Economic and environmental impact comparisons of various energy sources including wind, photovoltaic, hydrogen, geothermal, and bio-fuels. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: ENERGY 2130. Lecture, Lab
         
  • ENERGY 3130
    • 3 credits
    • Sustainability I: Ecology, Population, and Econ
      • An open-ended comprehensive research or design project will be done on renewable energy, bio-energy, or bio-products, by multi-disciplinary teams. Discussion and experiences in project management, team work, and ethics will be included. A written report and formal presentation are required. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENERGY 3240 and senior standing
         
  • ENERGY 3230
    • 3 credits
    • Biorenewable Resources
      • History of Biorenewable resource utilization. Fundamental principles of thermodynamics and chemisty as applied to bioenergy and biorenewable resources including discussion of biopolymer structure and routing of these biopolymers to dedicated energy production models. Current and projected biorenewable resource base, including waste materials and dedicated energy crops. Coverage of genetic efforts to engineer biomass possessing higher energy densities and yields. Overview of production practices of dedicated energy crops. Description of process heat, stationary power, fuels, chemicals, and fibers derived from biorenewable resources. Heat and power conversion processes including combustion, gasification, and anaerobic digestion. Environmental impacts, sustainability, and economics of biorenewable resource use.
         
  • ENERGY 3240
    • 4 credits
    • Fundamentals of Energy Sources
      • Traditional, renewable, and bio-energy sources and their characteristics. Advantages and disadvantages of existing and future sources of energy and bio-products. Economic and environmental impact comparisons of various energy sources including wind, photovoltaic, hydrogen, geothermal, and bio-fuels. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: ENERGY 2130. Lecture, Lab
  • ENERGY 3330
    • 3 credits
    • Energy Conversion, Transmission and Storage
      • Conversion of energy to and from various forms.  Transmission of energy, via electricity and fuels.  Storage of energy, in chemical, electrical, magnetic, and thermal forms.  Combustion, electric motors, steam engines, and internal-combustion engines.  Batteries, fuel-cells, hydrogen and synthetic fuels.
  • ENERGY 3430
    • 3 credits
    • Green Building Design
      • Students will study emerging delivery systems for high performance green buildings. The concept of integrated design is introduced together with emphasis on the main sustainable elements of the building including building site, water, energy, building construction, and Economics and Life-Cycle Costing Analysis. An overview provided on the different rating systems available including LEED, Green Globes, and other available international systems. Emphasis is given on the certification process of the USGBC Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design LEED systems as well as an introduction to energy modeling software.
         
  • ENERGY 3530
    • 3 credits
    • Project Management for Renewable Energy
      • This course will provide the student with an overview of issues related to project management as it pertains to renewable energy projects.  This will include defining what a project and project life cycle is and discussing what project management is as well as the role of the project manager.  The five Process Groups will be defined as it relates to renewable energy: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing.  Finally a student will be provided with an overview of the nine Project Management Knowledge Areas: Integration, Scope, Time, Cost, Quality, Human Resource, Communications, Risk, and Procurement.
         
  • ENERGY 3950
    • 1-2 credits
    • Coop
      • Enhancement of the educational experience through the placement of a student with a business, industry, or institution under the direction of the director of renewable energy program. During co-op, the student is expected to be away from his/her studies at UW-Platteville and work for a company or institution for a semester. (Spring or Fall)
         
  • ENERGY 3970
    • 1-2 credits
    • Internship
      • Enhancement of the educational experience through the placement of a student with a business, industry, or institution under the direction of the director of renewable energy program. Internship is designed to provide experiential learning experience to the student during the summer period. (Summer)
  • ENERGY 4130
    • 3 credits
    • Sustainability Policy and Practice
      • Examination of sustainability practices in business concerns; the use of CERES and LEEDS standards for evaluating responsiveness to sustainability concerns.  Policy initiatives at the government level, sustainability as a business practice, and the relationship between sustainable business practices and the triple-bottom line of finance, social, and ecological considerations.
         
  • ENERGY 4230
    • 3 credits
    • Biofuels
      • Advanced study of biofuels with emphasis on bioethanol and biodiesel. Historical development of the bioethanol industry. Chemistry, biochemistry and microbiology of lignocellulosic biomass. Industrial-scale bioethanol production including biotechnology, biochemical engineering, process management, economics, and sustainability. Production of other bio-based fuels from various biorenewable resources, including biodiesel, methanol, glycerol, and butanol. Emerging biofuel technologies including algae-derived diesel and hydrogen, and microbial fuel cells. Discussion of integrated processes and the biorefinery concept.
         
  • ENERGY 4330
    • 3 credits
    • Wind and Solar Energy Systems Design
      • Wind and solar energy resources in the US and the world.  Wind speed-power relations and wind resource assessment.  Wind power systems design and operation.  Wind generators and connection to power grid.  Operation and modeling of photovoltaic (PV) cells.   PV array design and load matching.   PV systems design integration.  Stand alone and grid connected systems.   Solar heating and cooling systems.
         
  • ENERGY 4430
    • 3 credits
    • Adv Topics in Building
      • This course will continue the topics surveyed in Building Systems 1, with more detail, depth, and application.  Given proposed usage and location data, students will specify and design building systems, envelopes, and placement of buildings.  Energy generation and conservation devices and systems, and energy efficient building environment enhancement devices will be proposed, and their embedded energy costs, and life cycle costs will be determined and detailed.  Retrofits of existing buildings aimed at energy conservation and environmental enhancement may also be studied and proposed.  Prereq: Energy 3430 Building Design 1
  • ENERGY 4620
    • 2 credits
    • Monitoring Control and Instrumentation Lab
      • This hands-on laboratory course will familiarize the students with systems used to monitor and control renewable energy systems.  Students will explore devices and circuits used in solar hot water and photovoltaic systems, wind systems, and bioenergy systems.  Sensors commonly used, signal interfacing, measurement electronics, and various types of control devices will be used and tested.  Students will design and build basic controls and interfaces.  Computer and/or microcontroller based controls will be explored, as time and student preparation permits.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The Council is continuing its evaluation of courses from other programs and will update the list as it approves more courses. It is anticipated that this list will be significantly larger when the Council completes its work with regard to elective courses for the minor.

 

Clear Float

This pane clears float!

Footer Anchor